Parent Assessment Tool

Find your child's developmental milestones by their age.  Please note that every child develops at a different pace.  Some may develop their motor skills earlier and speech later or vice versa.

Jump to:

Three Months Six Months Nine Months Twelve Months
Eighteen Months 2 Years Ages 3-4 Ages 4-6
Ages 6-8 Ages 8-10 Ages 10-12 Ages 12-15
       

 

Developmental Stages
(3 months – 15 years)

Three Months

A good rule of thumb motor development in infants is: Back to sleep – Belly to play

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • Raises head and chest when lying on stomach
  • Opens and shuts hands to grasp and shake hand toys
  • Brings hand to mouth
  • Moves arms and legs with no trouble

Language

  • Smiles when hearing your voice/ reacts to sound
  • Begins to make cooing sounds and babble
  • Begins to imitate some sounds
  • Turns head toward voices or noises

Cognitive/Vision

  • Watches faces closely
  • Stares at parent's face when talked to
  • Eyes follow people or moving objects
  • Recognizes familiar objects and people at a distance
  • Starts using hands and eyes in coordination

Social/Emotional

  • May cry when tired or uncomfortable
  • Likes to cuddle and smile
  • Becomes startled by loud noises
  • Imitates some movements and facial expressions

 

Six Months

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • First signs of teething
  • Puts everything in mouth
  • Rolls over in both directions (front to back and back to front)
  • Sits with head up and without support of hands
  • Reaches for objects and transfers from hand to hand

Language

  • Begins to respond to "no"
  • Develops different cries for different emotions/needs
  • Recognizes direction of sound and turns head toward sound
  • Laughs, babbles and squeals
  • Distinguishes emotions by tone of voice
  • Responds to sound by making sounds

Cognitive/Vision

  • Develops complete color vision
  • Develops ability to follow moving objects
  • Social/Emotional
  • Interested in other children and social play
  • Fascinated by reflection in mirror
  • Responds to other people's expressions of emotion

 

Nine Months

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • Shakes head back in forth (left to right as if to say "no")
  • Bangs two objects together
  • Picks up objects
  • Sits easily
  • Pulls at furniture to stand
  • Crawls
  • Enjoys playing peek-a-boo
  • Waves bye-bye
  • Walking begins (9-18 months)

Language

  • Responds to own name (six to twelve months)
  • Responds to sound without seeing the source (six to twelve months)
  • Babbles sounds like da, ma and ba (six to twelve months)
  • Cognitive/Vision
  • Eyes can move with little head movement
  • Visually inspects toys held in own hand

Social/Emotional

  • Recognizes and responds to name
  • Shows anxiety when separated from parent or caregiver
  • Taps, smiles, gets excited over reflection in mirror
  • Smiles when praised

 

12 Months

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • Reaches sitting position without assistance
  • Crawls on hands and knees
  • Pulls self up to stand
  • Walks holding on to furniture
  • Stands momentarily without support
  • May walk a few steps without support

Language

  • Responds to simple verbal requests
  • Responds to "no"
  • Uses simple gestures, such as shaking head for "no"
  • Babbles with inflection
  • Says "dada" and/or "mama"
  • Uses exclamations, such as "Oops!"
  • Says a few words
  • Tries to imitate actions and words
  • Develops words rapidly (about one to three words by 12-14 months)

Cognitive/Vision

  • Explores objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping)
  • Looks at correct picture when the image is named
  • Identifies specific body parts when asked (i.e. eyes, nose)
  • Imitates gestures like pointing and waiving
  • Knows own name
  • Looks at simple pictures with interest (14-18 months)
  • Points to object or people using words like "look" or "see" (14-18 months)

Social and Emotional

  • Cries when mother or father leaves – likes familiar adult to be in sight/shy or anxious with strangers
  • Shows specific preferences for certain people and toys
  • Tests parental responses to his/her behavior. (What do you do if he/she cries after you leave the room?)
  • May be fearful in some situations
  • Repeats sounds or gestures for attention
  • Shows affection
  • Self-Help/Adaptive
  • Begins to use objects correctly (drinking from cup, brushing hair, dialing phone, listening to receiver)
  • Finger-feeds well
  • Extends arm or leg to help when being dressed

 

18 Months

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • Walks alone with good balance
  • Starts to run
  • Opens doors

Language

  • Develops words rapidly (about 10-15 words by 18 months)
  • Uses short phrases
  • Follows simple directions (like "go get your toy") without you pointing
  • Focuses quietly when sound is presented

Cognitive/Vision

  • Laughs at silly things
  • Lets you know what he/she wants
  • Follows simple directions
  • Builds tower of three blocks
  • Throws a ball
  • No safety judgment
  • Pretends while playing
  • Looks at objects you point to

Social and Emotional

  • May get frustrated and throw tantrums
  • Self-Help/Adaptive
  • Uses spoon

 

2 Years

Fine and Gross Motor Skills

  • Walks alone
  • Carries large toy or several toys while walking
  • Stands on tiptoe
  • Kicks a ball
  • Climbs
  • Runs, walks up and down stairs and jumps with help
  • Scribbles impulsively
  • Turns over container to pour out contents
  • Can use cup with one hand

Language

  • Points to object or picture when it's named for him
  • Recognizes names of familiar people, objects and body parts
  • Says several single words (by 15 to 18 months)
  • Uses simple phrases (by 18 to 24 months)
  • Uses two- to four-word sentences
  • Follows simple instructions
  • Repeats words overheard in conversation
  • Attends & responds to verbal cues, when interested
  • Combines words, adds words daily (has about 50 words)

Cognitive/Vision

  • Begins to sort by shapes and colors
  • Begins make-believe play
  • Listens to short stories
  • Turns pages of a book
  • Sometimes looks and checks things out without needing to touch
  • Watches hand while scribbling

Social/Emotional

  • Imitates behavior of others, especially adults and older children
  • Aware of others' emotions
  • Increasingly enthusiastic about company of other children
  • Shows emotions by giving hugs and kisses
  • Demonstrates increasing independence
  • Begins to do opposite of what is asked
  • Episodes of separation anxiety increase toward midyear then fade

 

Ages 3-4

Physical and mental:

  • Can pedal tricycle
  • Increased skill in ball games (throwing, kicking, catching)
  • Can carry conversation
  • Uses spoon and fork
  • Knows full name and sometimes age
  • Knows names of many colors
  • Stays dry most nights
  • Likes to dress self
  • Begins to understand cause and effect
  • Some understanding of past, present and future

Social:

  • Less frequent temper tantrums
  • Likes to help adults
  • Usually potty trained
  • Engages in make-believe play
  • Shows affection toward siblings and other children
  • Understands sharing but sometimes needs encouragement
  • Expresses wide range of emotions

 

Ages 4-6

  • Attention span increases
  • Starts to show more interest in adults and peers outside of the family
  • Learns new skills almost daily
  • Very curious about their world and full of questions about how things work
  • Will begin to talk back
  • Better understands concepts and categories, such "A cat is an animal."
  • Starts testing his/her independence
  • Like to be perceived as being "good" and may start to place blame.

 

Ages 6-8

  • Becomes involved in out-of-home activities
  • Becomes embarrassed by parents' public displays of affection
  • Develops special interests in hobbies
  • May have re-emergence of tantrums
  • May start to develop conflict between play activities, homework and mealtimes
  • Curiosity runs rampant.  May ask how their body works, where babies come from, etc.
  • May start to tell tales and treat others unkindly.  Need clear rules and guidance about what is and is not acceptable behavior.

 

Ages 8-10

  • Friends are very important to them
  • Girls start to develop faster than boys
  • Boys often enjoy rough and tumble play
  • Starting to learn about sex and babies
  • Start to tell dirty jokes
  • Enjoy researching subjects that interest them
  • May become argumentative
  • Stop believing in fantasy figures and fairy tales

 

Ages 10-12

  • Girls may start to menstruate
  • Children become self-conscious of their bodies
  • May have rapid growth spurts, which may mean large appetite but less energy
  • Start to show interest in opposite sex, school dances, etc.
  • Become concerned with being "in" and accepted
  • May begin to challenge adult knowledge
  • Great at dramatizing and often develop exaggerated expressions
  • May start to develop acne
  • Start to take risks

 

Ages 12-15

  • Sudden rapid growth
  • Physical strength increases greatly
  • Can go through awkward stage
  • Girls reach physical maturity
  • Both sexes become very concerned with their appearance
  • Many teens suffer from rapid acne
  • Better able to plan and engage in introspective thinking
  • Knows right from wrong and will readily accept responsibility for their behavior
  • Tend to have a wide circle of friends comprised of both boys and girls
  • Communication is key to minimize the turbulence of teenage years
  • May resent being told what to do and can often be moody
  • Exercise rebellion
  • Can hold down important responsibilities such as baby-sitting
  • Needs to feel important in the adult world