ADDITIONAL SENIOR / INDEPENDENT LIVING RESOURCES

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2018 The Child and Family Services CELEBRATION


On this night, CFS will not only MAKE history, but will BE history.

YOU have played a PIVOTAL role in our journey, so we want to celebrate WITH YOU!

This is when we will reveal our NEW NAME, NEW LOOK - NEW BRAND

CFS CELEBRATION 2018

Thurs. Nov. 15,
5:30-8:00pm
Downtown Manchester Hotel
formerly the Radisson

On this night, standing on the shoulders of our past, we will touch the future.

Mission forward.

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buttonnn Click here,or call our Event Maven, 603-518-4156

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A conference on children of incarcerated parents

 

REGISTER NOW

Keynote

According to a study released in 2016 by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, an estimated 5 percent of NH’s children are experiencing parental incarceration. Currently, there are 271,400 children in NH, which means that 13,570 kids are living a shared sentence with an imprisoned family member.

Child and Family Services and the Family Connections Center present COUNTING THE DAYS, a special 1-day conference to focus on the unique needs of children of incarcerated parents. This conference will be especially important for child and family therapists, law enforcement officials, educators, school guidance counselors, social workers, juvenile service professionals, corrections officers, child welfare workers, legislators, mental health professionals, child advocates, CASA volunteers, youth mentors, judicial/court personnel, and others.  

CEUs: NH NASW 5.5 hours Category I

Keynote speaker/facilitator:  Ann Adalist-Estrin, director of the National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey, where she also teaches in the department of sociology, anthropology and criminal justice. Ann is an author, speaker and consultant to a wide variety of agencies serving children and families in the U.S. and abroad. Ann is also a child and family therapist in Jenkintown, PA and a trainer for the Healthy Steps for Young Children Pediatric Training Program at Boston University School of Medicine.  In 2013, she was honored at the White House as a "Champion of Change" for her work as an advocate for children and families of the incarcerated.

Training Objectives:

  • To learn the developmental and circumstantial influences on a child with an incarcerated parent
  • To learn  about family dynamics in families of the incarcerated
  • To learn the typical feelings of children of the incarcerated
  • To learn risk factors and their impact on children of the incarcerated
  • To understand the impact of trauma and toxic stress on children of the incarcerated.
  • To increase awareness and understanding of the impact of race, class and ethnicity on children and families of the incarcerated
  • To encourage self-reflection and insight related to reactions and perspectives on families involved in the criminal justice system
  • To apply this knowledge to a variety of services and programs
  • To identify strategies for responding to the needs


Program Schedule:

8:30-9:00  Check in
9:00  Keynote presentation
10:45  Break
11:00  Keynote presentation (continued)
12:00  NH video montage
LUNCH (provided)
1:00  Table activity
1:30  Panel response to table activity
2:15  Break
2:30  What's next for New Hampshire:  Four skills analysis activity, resulting in 5 key recommendation areas
3:30-3:45  Evaluation & adjourn


This event is funded in part by:

Annie E Casey Foundation, New Hampshire Charitable Foundation and Coaches Collective International

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Subtitle:  A conference on children of incarcerated parents

 

October 38, 2016, 8:30am-3:45pm

 

Grappone Center, Concord, NH

 

Keynote speaker/facilitator:  Ann Adalist-Estrin, director of the National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey, where she also teaches in the department of sociology, anthropology and criminal justice. Ann is an author, speaker and consultant to a wide variety of agencies serving children and families in the U.S. and abroad. Ann is also a child and family therapist in Jenkintown, PA and a trainer for the Healthy Steps for Young Children Pediatric Training Program at Boston University School of Medicine.  In 2013, she was honored at the White House as a "Champion of Change" for her work as an advocate for children and families of the incarcerated.

 

 

·         $60 per person (includes light breakfast & lunch)

 

·         Applying for CEUs through the NH Board of Mental Health

 

 

Registration opens here on ___________. 

 

Training Objectives:

·         To learn the developmental and circumstantial influences on a child with an incarcerated parent.

·         To learn  about family dynamics in families of the incarcerated

·         To learn the typical feelings of children of the incarcerated

·         To learn risk factors and their impact on children of the incarcerated

·         To understand the impact of trauma and toxic stress on children of the incarcerated.

·         To increase awareness and understanding of the impact of race, class and ethnicity on children and families of the incarcerated

·         To encourage self-reflection and insight related to reactions and perspectives on families involved in the criminal justice system

·         To apply this knowledge to a variety of services and programs

·         To identify strategies for responding to the needs

 

This event is funded in part by:

Annie E Casey Foundation, HNH Foundation, and New Hampshire Charitable Foundation 

 

2018sleepoutumb

EVENT DATE: Mar 23, 2018

What does youth homelessness look like?  You can't always tell. Kids with backpacks, walking down the street---could be any kid.  And our numbers show that a few thousand youth in New Hampshire experienced homelessness last year.  Some are in school.  Some have jobs.  Some are escaping abusive or neglectful homes, and some have been rejected from their own families for being different.  Some struggle with trauma or mental illness, and others still, with addiction.  Some are hungry, cold, and scared.  Some are taking desperate measures to survive.   And most of them are flying under the radar of their own communities. 

The CFS SleepOut is an annual event through which we endeavor to raise our community consciousness about the problem, raise funds to aid and advocate for these youth, and get another step closer to ending youth homelessness in New Hampshire. 

 

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

Child and Family Services is unique in its array of services for young people who are experiencing homelessness.   The Street Outreach team puts boots on the ground and serves as a lifeline to at risk youth wherever they may be, offering two essential things:  the basic elements to survive and the stuff with which to succeed.  The Runaway & Homeless Youth Program provides crisis intervention and prevention in schools and the community, and can help youth resolve family conflict.  At the Youth Resource Center, youth can access basic needs such as food, clothes, showers, and laundry, as well as life-changing services such as mental health counseling, substance misuse treatment, educational advocacy, job skills training, and more. The Transitional Living Program provides housing and support services to homeless youth as they advance toward independence and success.

JOIN US, Friday, March 23, Stanton Plaza, downtown Manchester, NH.  Sleep out with us.  Support us.  Spread the word about our event.

SLEEPERS: What to expect

THANK YOU!!!!!!    And, remember:  #NoRestUntil

KEY FACTS NURSING AND PERSONAL CARE

 

Contact:  Dottie Gove, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Call:  (603) 518-4305

 

Areas Served:

Greater Manchester, Greater Concord, Greater Nashua

 

Fees 

Service-based fee; Free Service for Choices for Independence clients. Some grant funding for seniors over the age of 60 without the ability to pay full fee. 

Referral Form

Application for Title XX Services

 

Funding

The CFS Home Care program is funded in part by a Manchester City Improvement Project grant, Choices for Independence, and the NH Bureau of Elderly and Adult Services, Mary Gale Foundation, Pearl Manor Fund, City of Nashua, Merrimack County.